Steadfastness

I should be writing about joy. I was so excited to pursue the subject that I had begun researching and listing Bible verses. I wasn’t only inspired, my hope received a fresh brushing up also. For days and nights, the words formed themselves into sentences and the sentences arranged themselves into paragraphs in my mind. “Okay,” I told myself. “Joy it will be for Writing Monday.”

steadfastness

Then Sunday came and I found myself lying in a prone position (again!), waiting for my labored breathing to ease up. The suffering was long and wearying. It was the antithesis of my fervent prayers for wellness and strength I particularly prayed for that day. “I can’t write about joy. At least, not at this time,” I thought as I fought the negative emotions that were hovering at the doors of my mind. “Shall I be angry? Shall I be discouraged? Shall I give up already?” These emotions are old, as far as I’m concerned, and even they have lost their appeal to me. Before I completely gave up on those self-defeating thoughts, a pained question passed over my mind, “Are You walking with me, Lord?”

My thoughts shifted to: “I will write about a God-honoring life.” My mind toyed with the idea as I waited for good breathing. But after a while, I gave it up. That, too, seemed a Herculean task (as far as inspiration is concerned) when placed side by side with my suffering body. “I pray that my life will always honor God however hard I’m going through. But I can’t write about that now, either,” I thought with finality and a sigh.

Suddenly, the scene on the Prophet Elijah fleeing from Jezebel unfolded in my mind. I am no prophet but I wanted to compare my situation with his. He had been very zealous for God, and now, they sought to kill him. He sat under a broom tree and sulked and wished that he could just die. Elijah waited but God wasn’t in the strong wind; He wasn’t in the earthquake either; neither was He in the fire. Then, he heard His still, small voice. (See 1 Kings 19).

In the midst of my strong winds of suffering, I couldn’t write about joy; neither could I write about a subject as lofty as ‘a God-honoring life’ while fierce shaking continues to jolt me in my long, fiery trial. Then a still, small voice whispered, steadfastness. “Yes, maybe that I can write about,” my heart answered.

Steadfastness is the state of being “firm in purpose, resolution, faith, attachment, etc.” To be steadfast is to be unwavering. Yet, not all Christians are steadily strong and immovable, especially during season of hard testing. I myself have encountered all sorts of challenges against my steadfastness, but though these have tried to topple me (at times, the struggle is so great to the point of a temporary spiritual crisis), the Lord has always held me fast.

When I said, “My foot is slipping,”
    your unfailing love, Lord, supported me.
When anxiety was great within me,
    your consolation brought me joy. (Ps. 94:18-19 NIV)

He is faithful to His promise:

I will never leave thee, nor forsake thee. (Heb. 13:5)

But though His promises stand, we need to do our part. In fact, much work needs to be done: unceasing prayers (sometimes with fasting), being rooted in the Word, closely walking in the Spirit, and never losing sight of God’s perfect will. But sometimes we grow faint even with prayer, especially when there is only barren land as far as our eyes can see. In trials, patience tends to thin out into a fragile film that it is just hard to take hold of it without it breaking in our hands.

The Lord knows it, that’s why it was necessary for Him to tell a story about being persistent in prayer (see Luke 18:1-8). Also, St. James teaches that the development of patience is the very purpose of trials and reminds us that there is a blessing at the end of our faithful endurance.

My brethren, count it all joy when you fall into various trials, knowing that the testing of your faith produces patience. But let patience have its perfect work, that you may be perfect and complete, lacking nothing. (James 1:2-4)

My brethren, take the prophets, who spoke in the name of the Lord, as an example of suffering and patience. Indeed we count them blessed who endure. You have heard of the perseverance of Job and seen the end intended by the Lord—that the Lord is very compassionate and merciful. (James 5: 10-12)

Below is a simple diagram we can remember in cultivating steadfastness in our lives with the Holy Spirit and Word of God acting as catalysts:

Perseverance + patience = steadfastness

Steadfastness is a combination of these but what does it really look like? I wish that, for me, it always looked like a young maiden in the peak of health who sings praises to God like there’s no tomorrow, who worships without any reservation, and who humbly bends the knees in fervent prayer, steadfast, immovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, knowing that [her] labor is not in vain in the Lord (1 Cor. 15:58); she walks with a spring in her step! But truth be told, my steadfastness sometimes takes on the form of a middle-aged woman, stooped due to gnawing worries and anxieties that are never completely banished, and who trudges through life as if walking on sodden sand.

That’s why we should always desire to seek revival for our souls. We need not wait for a Churchwide revival. On our own, in our private worship, we can be revived. That is the desire and will of God for us.

For the kingdom of God is not meat and drink; but righteousness, and peace, and joy in the Holy Ghost. (Rom. 14:17)

The kingdom of God is righteousness, peace, and joy in the Holy Ghost. Making this as our guidepost, we will not lose sight of the kingdom of God, and in fact, we will learn to live at the center of it.

One Sunday service, I was gifted with an epiphany. When the preacher said that God had made everything perfect in paradise where Adam and Eve were supposed to have lived all their lives, a vision of a kingdom-centered life opened up in the scenery of my mind like Eden herself flinging her shining, gilded doors wide open:

What if we lived like we were already in the kingdom of God where everything is perfect? Then we would live in His perfect will, His perfect love, peace, and joy.

In God’s kingdom, fear can’t exist. There, the devil wouldn’t have a foothold in our lives. What if, unlike Eve, we would not listen to the devil’s temptings and lies but live on the side of God’s perfectness? Life in the kingdom, here and now, would be filled with joy.

In God’s paradise, fights and hurts do not exist. If we live as kingdom people, these things would no longer matter to us. We can easily forgive and forget and go to sleep in peace with a smile gracing our lips.

We can live as kingdom people through the power of the Holy Spirit that dwells in us.. These scenarios are all possible for our citizenship is in heaven (see Phil. 3:20) and God raised us up together, and made us sit together in the heavenly places in Christ Jesus (see Eph. 2:6).

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Comments

  1. Hazel Moon says:

    Steadfastness – I like that. I also liked what you said about having your personal “revival,” and not waiting for revival to come to the “church.” Joy comes in the morning – perhaps next Monday you will write about joy. Thank you for sharing with us here at Tell me a Story.

    • RinaPeru says:

      Yes, whatever kind of misery I am in, I can always run to the throne of grace, to the arms of the Father, through songs of praise and worship. And when the tears have found their way out, I know I have been embraced by my Savior. I have found that deliverance from all negative emotions, weaknesses, and self-defeating thoughts happens in His presence.

  2. Yes, we can only live, as you pointed out, as kingdom people by the power of the Holy Spirit. I’m sorry you were having trouble breathing…thank you for modeling steadfastness as you wrote this post….blessings to you :-)

    • RinaPeru says:

      I am not always that strong spiritually, Dolly, especially in the midst of physical difficulties and uncertainties, or just the weight of waiting and hungering for healing. But the Lord is faithful to supply the grace to see me through each challenge or struggle.

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