Trappings

I am fascinated to look at our Church’s mimers’ costumes and observe how they have evolved through the years. It seems to me that every year, they are becoming more and more “interesting”. That is to say, the accoutrements have become more complicated, intricate. There are different mimer groups from outreaches around the country and when they come to the Central Church on special occasions, one would see the diverse colors and designs of their garb. The cut is becoming more meticulous: sleeves flaring out from the elbows like a 360-degree fan, vests covered with sequins, sleeves fanning out from the shoulders down the length of the dress so that when the mimer spreads out her arms, they look like diaphanous wings. Other embellishments include glittering fabrics, floral appliqués, sheer, bright fabric attached somewhere in the body which flies with the wind when the mimer moves. The colors are mostly combination of whites, blues, and bright pinks.

My watercolor painting of white lilies on 9" x 12" 100% cotton wc paper.

My watercolor painting of white lilies on 9″ x 12″ 100% cotton wc paper.

One time I commented to family about this. Then someone asked me that if I were to design the mimers’ costume, what would it be like? When it came to adorning myself, I always knew what I want: simple but elegant. The elegance is emphasized in the sheer simplicity of the garb.

So I told the family that if I were to design the mimers’ costume, it would be made of pure white, flowy fabric, cinched at the waist, then flows down to the ankles in full biased, the sleeves fanning out like wings, and the only color is the wide gold girdle around the waist. (Maybe what was playing on in my mind was the description of the Lord Jesus’ clothing when the apostle John saw Him).

I tend to lean toward simplicity and bring out the real beauty out of that. Especially now that I am a Christ lover.

But recently when I was combing through the books of Moses in the Old Testament, I observed that God has a penchant for a wide array of precious jewels and embroideries of golden threads adorning the tabernacle and the priests’ vestments. He was very meticulous in laying out every single detail to Moses. In my imagination, they were regal to a fault. Fit for a king. So, the mimers’ desire to adorn themselves with such elaborate trappings is just being true to the Old Testament picture. And I smiled.

But I can’t help focusing on the New Testament where the center is the Lord Jesus Christ: the embodiment of simplicity. I close my eyes and imagine myself walking where the Saviour and His disciples walked, even the life of the early Christians after the Lord’s ascension, and I get the overall theme of the time, which was stark simplicity. From the birth of Christ to His death, His life spoke of simplicity. No trappings. Just the pure Saviour of the world, Word became flesh Healer that was manifested for all to behold.

Has God changed then? No. We know that God changes not (see Mal. 3:6). But the physical tabernacle that was described in the OT where God promised to dwell in has become the Body of Christ, comprised of believers where the Spirit of the Lord dwells.

For you are the temple of the living God. As God has said:

“I will dwell in them
And walk among them.
I will be their God,
And they shall be My people.” (2 Cor. 6:16)

We need not adorn ourselves with costly jewels and clothing for the Holy Spirit to come dwell in us. He will abide in the heart of him or her who has wholly received the Lord Jesus Christ and who now walks after Him and not after the flesh.

I believe that the adornments of a Christ follower are now those of godliness: humility, modesty, a worshipful and grateful heart. The truth of God, the grace of the Gospel, the power of the Holy Spirit.

that the women adorn themselves in modest apparel, with propriety and moderation, not with braided hair or gold or pearls or costly clothing, but, which is proper for women professing godliness, with good works. (1 Tim. 2: 9-10)

But, oh. Here’s the sad part: We put on trappings not necessarily made of jewels, fabric, or any other superfluous materials. We put on pride, the inner desire to be admired, liked, or loved, false confidence, even spurious love and service to Christ.

That is why there are some of us who make extra effort to make our photos “like-able”, to make our lives appear perfect (if only on social media). Oh, I know. I am guilty of it on occasions, too. And unless I present myself to my Father in heaven, bare and vulnerable, I would continue doing it, even though only subconsciously. But He speaks, and by His grace, I listen.

It dawned on me recently that these trappings that we put on can be the reasons why fear takes a grip on us sometimes and we feel weak. Last week, when I saw my daisy meadow painting used as the backdrop for the testimony pulpit during a very special occasion in church, I felt so excited my heartbeat became so fast and erratic I began to hypervent and almost fainted. My illness doesn’t allow me to get overly excited or depressed because it affects my breathing. Before that, I was having a hard time recovering from a full lunch (that usually happens). It was aggravated when I saw my enlarged painting.

I uttered in my mind over and over, “All glory belongs to You, Lord”, while doing my best to downplay my emotions. After a while of this and silent prayers, the Holy Spirit spoke in my heart:

You are experiencing this because your first reaction was to be happy and proud of yourself. It is hard for you to sever your emotions from the pure and the sullied and I understand that. But if you focus your heart and mind on Me, only Me, not on yourself or your surroundings, peace will descend and settle in your heart and you will be calm.

Hallelujah! We have a Savior who knows our frailties. Aren’t we glad of that? I am deeply grateful that I am known perfectly of God.

For we do not have a High Priest who cannot sympathize with our weaknesses, but was in all points tempted as we are, yet without sin. (Heb. 4:15)

Fear reigns in our hearts when we are not pure in heart. When we put on the trappings of this world and not Christ. The worldly mindset is for us to put on the things of this world to be approved and admired by it. But the Bible tells us to put on Christ.

But put on the Lord Jesus Christ, and make no provision for the flesh, to fulfill its lusts. (Rom. 13:14)

And we are not talking only of the issues of the heart, but the material trappings that we love to adorn ourselves with. Just because. We make extra effort to put on goodly apparel, even sacrificing simplicity and modesty which we have learned in Christ. He tells us to consider the lilies of the valley…

The Lord wants us to look at the lilies of the valley. Simple and not superfluous.

When people look at us, what do they see? Do they see the imprint of the world or of the Lord Jesus Christ? Do they glorify God because of what they see in us or is the Body of Christ criticized?

And the world is passing away along with its desires, but whoever does the will of God abides forever. (1 John 2:17)

If you have been blessed by your visit here, I’d love for you to like Our Healing Moments on Facebook and connect with me there. To not miss any posts, I also invite you to subscribe below. Thank you!

Linking up with Sharing His BeautyTrue StoriesTell His StoryWise WomenCoffee for Your HeartFaith Filled Friday.

Journey with Jesus,

Comments

  1. Betty Draper says:

    the adornments of a Christ follower are now those of godliness: humility, modesty, a worshipful and grateful heart. Yes, yes, yes, Great post.

    • RinaPeru says:

      Thank you, Betty. I wrote this because of something I see in the Body of Christ that really disturbs me: when you expect to see Christlikeness, you see the marks of worldliness.

  2. BettieG says:

    Such a beautiful thought: “Hallelujah! We have a Savior who knows our frailties. Aren’t we glad of that? I am deeply grateful that I am known perfectly of God” I am so thankful that He does understand when I revert back to my old trappings–but He is there so quickly to help me! May I learn to hear Him when He is bringing His help to me! –Blessings to you!

    • RinaPeru says:

      Yes, Bettie, when we come before Him with humble, repentant hearts, He will show us what we have been “putting on” which obliterates Him and we will then see clearly. Blessings!

  3. Hazel Moon says:

    Sorry the excitement was too much for you, but I understand how joyous you were to have your painting used as a backdrop. Our pastor dresses in simple everyday clothes with no pretention and not even a suit and tie. I wonder how much pride goes into all the expensive garb worn by some in the ministry. I do believe a minister should look clean, neat and dressed nicely. Myself, I like to see a minister dressed in a nice suit and tie for men, and for women a nice but simple suit or dress. My opinion !! Thank you for sharing with us here at Tell me a Story.

    • RinaPeru says:

      Nice words, as usual, my dear Hazel. In our church here in the Philippines, the men wear the “Barong Tagalog”. It is a very formal men’s wear, especially for church. What really weighs down on my heart and soul is the inclination of some in the Body of Christ to live a life that is more worldly than Christlike when one looks at their garb.

Share Your Thoughts

*